Chad from Stratford, WI

RG3 says sometimes he tries to draw penalties on players when running out of bounds. I know you try to get every advantage over an opponent, but this goes too far.

He’s tempting fate. Maybe defensive players will try to get there earlier and hit a little harder, knowing they are being baited by a quarterback they consider to be unfairly favored by the league.

Kylon from Talofofo, Guam

Thanks for everything, Vic. Typhoon Francisco is going away and Guam is doing fine.

Good! Now we’ll see what happens to USC this weekend.

Marcus from Pleasant View, UT

What can Charles Johnson tell the Browns about the Packers that isn’t on film?

Any player who’s spent time with another team can provide critical information to his new team. That information could include something as important as a team’s audible system. Terry Bradshaw had to call all of Super Bowl XIV from the line of scrimmage because the Steelers had lost three coaches – one of them was defensive coordinator Bud Carson – to the Rams during the offseason and those coaches had the whole Steelers audible system and two weeks to teach it to the Rams defense. That’s why continuity is so important. The more players and coaches that leave your team and go to new teams, the more information the league’s other teams have on you. I don’t like the practice squad rules. I think a team should own the rights to players on their practice squad, and I think practice squad players should be paid the active-roster rookie minimum.

David from Los Angeles, CA

Vic, the past two weeks, nine field goals and just two touchdowns. Do you think this has McCarthy overly concerned and what would you anticipate, if anything, the Packers might try differently to overcome their recent red-zone difficulties?

The only way to fix the problem is to play better.

Dan from Houston, TX

According to the trade value chart, Calvin Johnson’s draft position was worth Jennings, Jordy, Cobb, Jones, Finley and Driver. Ted really is a bargain shopper. I’ll take a whole receiving corps over one stud, even if he is perhaps the second greatest receiver all time.

Whoa with that second greatest of all time stuff. A lot of great receivers have passed through this league. The biggest problem with drafting a receiver that high is that you’re going to have to pay him as though he’s a quarterback, and that’s a big bullet to take for a guy who plays a position at which you can find quality in the later rounds. I don’t like taking receivers that high because I need their money for the premium-position players, beginning with the quarterback. Be that as it may, if a wide receiver is good enough to be sitting that high on your board, then go ahead and take him, or trade back and recoup the value of the pick.

Hans from Cardiff, CA

Vic, thanks for your great work; always enjoy hearing your point of view. Not really a question, but an observation. Talked with a couple of Packers fan friends and they all agree that your “Ask Vic” column is a polarizing event. It divides fans along an IQ continuum. The ones who get it are above the “Ketchman Line,” the ones who don’t are below. Occasionally, a fan from below the “Ketchman Line” will wise up, rise up and move toward the light. For this we are all eternally grateful.

I covered the Pirates a little bit when Mario Mendoza played for them. He was as smooth a fielder as I’ve ever seen, but he was so anemic at the plate that he appeared to be swinging a whiffle ball bat. He was a pleasant man from Chihuahua, Mexico, and I went to him often for interviews because he played on a Pirates team that had a lot of jerks on it. Mario was one guy you could count on to give you a quote you could print. Never, ever did I think Mario would achieve the immortality he did. I am honored to be so compared.

 

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