Frazier from New York, NY

Do you think the Packers miss Don Barclay, especially as a run-blocker?

I think they miss the security he would’ve provided. I like the Packers’ offensive line. I think it’s playing at a high level.

Adam from Toronto, ON

Please change the intro to “Final Thoughts.” This is an embarrassment to watch, and get rid of the Steelers book you are reading, too. Thanks in advance.

No.

Tim from Normal, IL

Vic, you saw Kenny Anderson play for the Bengals. Why was he able to complete 64  percent of his passes one season prior to 1978 and put up stats similar to today’s passers, but greats like Bradshaw and Namath were barely completing half their passes? Was their offense ahead of its time?

Yeah, it was. Bill Walsh was the Bengals’ offensive coordinator and he was running a version of what would become known as the “West Coast offense.” It didn’t really fit in the years prior to the 1978 rules changes. Prior to the rules changes, the passing game was about throwing the ball downfield. That’s where Terry Bradshaw and Joe Namath excelled. The Bengals’ offense was often derisively referred to as dink and dunk. Once bump-and-run was outlawed, the “West Coast offense” was a perfect fit.

Tim from Denver, CO

Jason Whitlock stated last week that Midwestern football is dead, as far as college is concerned, specifically the Big Ten. I love Big Ten football and I don’t want this to be true, but in the back of my mind I think I have to agree. The Big Ten isn’t getting the recruits the SEC or Pac-12 get, and the powerhouses of our conference can’t beat the powerhouses of others. If you look at the draft, they are putting out some players, but the overall numbers show the Big Ten isn’t where the great football players are anymore. Can this be turned around?

It can only be turned around by going into the SEC’s and Pac-12’s recruiting territories and taking those conferences’ players. That’s where the talent is.

Bart from De Pere, WI

Vic, I have watched football since 1958, yet have never heard of the around-the-world play. Please fill us in.

It’s not a play, it was a rule that said the goal line extended around the world, which meant a player could score a touchdown by extending the ball across the goal line outside the pylon. It was in the rulebook for a long time, but I only saw it called once.

Joe from Menomonee Falls, WI

Vic, what defensive player do you see having a big game?

I think Julius Peppers and Clay Matthews are rapidly becoming the kind of complement to each other Dom Capers envisioned. I wouldn’t be the least bit surprised if either one of them or both had a big game on Sunday.

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