Ben from St. Marys, GA

What parts of Aaron Rodgers’ game can he still improve on?

Vic: I would think he would say consistency; that’s usually the answer you get from any player that has reached his level of skill. One of my favorite offensive coordinators, whose father, I’ve been told, reads this column, is fond of saying: “If you can do it once, you can do it every time.”

Neil from Superior, WI

Vic, up in the northern tip of Wisconsin, the only sports radio or news is about the Vikings. I can't say how much I enjoy reading some Packers talk on a daily basis. I don't know what all this kinder, gentler talk is all about, but I hope you speak it as you see it. That’s what makes a great sportswriter, in my opinion. Nice job so far and welcome to Packer nation. It’s not just a game, it’s a way of life.

Vic: I’m a straight shooter.

Bob from Clinton, NY

Considering current aptitude and skill level only, please rank your top 10 quarterbacks in the NFL.

Vic: 1. Aaron Rodgers, 2. Peyton Manning, 3. Tom Brady, 4. Drew Brees, 5. Ben Roethlisberger, 6. Philip Rivers, 7. Michael Vick, 8. Matt Ryan, 9. Matt Schaub, 10. Eli Manning.

Jeremy from Mosinee, WI

Do you think we will ever see a Super Bowl played here at Lambeau? If not, why? BTW, loving your column.

Vic: Aside from the obvious weather obstacle to such a thing happening, Green Bay just doesn’t have the hotels to host such an event. Last fall, I was fascinated by the speculation that Lambeau Field might host a Big Ten title game. I thought to myself, “What a great place for a Big Ten title game.” Lambeau really would be a perfect place to play such a game. The problem, of course, is that Green Bay just doesn’t have the hotel rooms to accommodate an event of that magnitude. In a lot of ways, that’s the charm of Green Bay.

Dave from Indianapolis, IN

I do not have a question but I work nights and sometimes there is nothing else to do but read up on things. Just wanted to say that reading your articles is refreshing and a bit fun at the same time. Thank you and keep up the great work.

Vic: I’ve always been a favorite of Colts fans.

Mike from Jackson, MS

You've discussed the BAP philosophy and how the Packers believe in it, as well. What teams, if any, don't believe in drafting the BAP?

Vic: The Falcons are admitted needs drafters. It appears they’re making it work, which only proves there’s no one way of doing anything. What’s most important is that whatever way you do it, you must believe in it.

Ellis from Wausau, WI

Why don't the helmet-makers surround them with a heavy liquid or jell to spread the impact, kinda like NASCAR did to their walls?

Vic: They’ve done that. I worked at a newspaper in Doug Plank’s hometown and I remember the coach there showing me the helmet Plank wore in high school. It was a special, water-filled helmet; big hitter, the Plank. There was a safety that played for the Bills years ago – I forget his name – who wore one of those kinds of helmets. It made him look like a bobble head doll. The bottom line is that the more you protect the head, the harder you can hit with it. At that point, simple blunt-force trauma becomes the issue. The size of boxing gloves are the perfect example. The heavier and more padded the gloves are, the longer and more often you can hit with your hands. You don’t want to make the head a weapon by over-protecting it. The new, over-sized helmets can have that effect, and that’s why the league is adamant about players not using their heads in such a manner. They want the helmet to be about protection, not aggression. It’s going to take time to undo what a lifetime of football has ingrained. By the way, the wall doesn’t hit the car, the car hits the wall, if you know what I mean.

Steve from Erie, PA

Please pass along to the person that made the decision to hire you into the Packer family, job well done. Your “Ask Vic” column has me checking out the Packers website way more often than I used to. Looks like the organization continues to be smart with all its personnel decisions, not just with the on-the-field players.

Vic: BAW?

Mike from Jacksonville, FL

Are general managers allowed to cheer in the press box?

Vic: Nobody is allowed to cheer in the press box, not even owners. It is a working environment; that’s it, period. It never ceases to amaze me how the average fan is aghast at this rule.

Sal from El Paso, TX

Fired? Are you serious, Vic? I thought you just moved because you were taking a step up. Gosh, if this is true, I'm suddenly seeing this organization in a different light. Set the record straight, huh?

Vic: Some years ago, I was asked why that yellow first-down line shows on the TV but you can’t see it on the field. I said I wasn’t sure but I think it was invisible paint. Well, that ignited a firestorm of dialogue on the matter; some readers wanted to know if I was serious. Every day, I threw more gas on the fire and the questions and commentary rolled on for days and days. Some readers begged me to stop the insanity; others told me to keep it going because it was so much fun. Wanna go for a record?

William from Jacksonville, FL

Who wouldn't want the best available surgeon to work on them or their loved ones? Who would want a doctor that cheers for one group of patients at the expense of another? We miss you but it’s clear you are enjoying such an historical place and team.

Vic: I’m back, baby.

Justin from Springfield, IL

What is your take on the possibility of expanding the regular season by two games?

Vic: When I started covering the NFL, training camp started right after the Fourth of July, it was nine weeks long and the preseason was six games. The regular season began the third week in Sept. Now we have something closer to a three-week training camp that bears little or no resemblance to Coach Lombardi’s camps and a four-game preseason in which the starters don’t play more than six quarters, and still it’s too long. I’m OK with an 18-game schedule. I’ll agree to anything to get rid of two more preseason games. I acknowledge the added demands of an 18-game season, but the players and coaches will find a way to deal with it.

Mark from Yucaipa, CA

Hey, Vic, your column is the best thing to happen to packers.com in years. Can you explain what is meant when they call a guy a three-technique or five-technique guy?

Vic: Three technique refers to a defensive lineman, usually a tackle, who is positioned between the guard and tackle. Coaches call it shading the outside shoulder of the guard. He’s the chase tackle, the guy who possesses the quickness to penetrate and disrupt. By contrast, the other tackle in a 4-3 is a one-technique guy who plays between the center and the guard; a nose tackle plays zero technique or head up on the center. Five technique refers to a defensive end playing on the outside shoulder of the offensive tackle.

Mark from Panama City Beach, FL

Have you found a favorite golf course up there, yet?

Vic: Golf course? I haven’t even seen the grass, yet.

Gerald from Karlsruhe, Germany

Thanks for your “Ask Vic,” which is the first reason for me to look at packers.com all day now. Sorry for my bad English. I am happy enough if you understand what I mean. May you please add a glossary for us good, old Europe fans?

Vic: Yinze: Mike McCarthy’s players.

Michael from Rio Rancho, NM

Who can I e-mail in the Packers organization that will answer my question? I have asked you twice and you have not answered. Why do you compose a title, show a photo and then not address it in your article?

Vic: Thank you so much for this question because we needed some balance. This column was just way too nice today. Hey, maybe somebody will see your question and fire me.

Vic Ketchman is a veteran of 39 NFL seasons and has covered the Steelers and Jaguars prior to coming to Green Bay.