Shayla from Riverside, CA

If you had to choose one quarterback at the prime of his career for one win-it-all season, would you choose Montana, Bradshaw, Rodgers or Brady?

I know it’s a slow time of year, but I don’t like these questions and I’m not going to answer them. Do you realize you’re talking about four quarterbacks with a combined Super Bowl record of 13-2? Montana and Bradshaw are a combined 8-0; they never lost one. I have long considered Montana to be No. 2 on my all-time quarterback list. Is that a good enough answer?

Tyler from Houston, TX

They say Damarious Randall is great at covering, but not physical when making a tackle. So with that said, would his covering skills make up for his lack of physicality?

My information is that Randall is a punishing tackler.

Jim from South Range, WI

Count me as another long-time Packers fan who loves your writing and insight and has a whole new appreciation for football thanks to you. I can think of several approaches the department of balls could take. Can you expand a bit on your intentions?

First of all, the department of balls would have to have a security division; the balls would have to be watched around the clock. Then, the department of balls would have to have an army of ballboys – a secret service of balls, so to speak – who would hold the balls during the game. These ballboys must submit themselves to intense background checks. The department of balls would also require licensed inflators. Or teams could just do the honorable thing and not cheat.

Bob from Hoffman Estates, IL

Vic, what is your favorite sport to watch after football?

I like to watch a down-to-the-wire golf tournament, such as this year’s TPC. I thought it was the best TPC I’ve ever seen. I watched baseball and golf yesterday. Neither one was very good.

Spencer from Monument, CO

Vic, how much value do teams place on players who are mediocre at what they do on the field but are fantastic leaders and mentors in the locker room?

You can’t mentor your way onto the roster.

Yancey from Richlands, VA

Vic, the number of journalists defending the Patriots’ actions is troubling. You agree?

I’m disappointed with the lack of outrage in the media. If the media is our conscience, we’ve got a problem.

Nolan from West Salem, WI

With all the versatility Ted Thompson has drafted, do you think fans get too hung up on the base defense and who is considered the starter? Shouldn’t we look at the entire roster and its ability to contribute?

Yes, we should do that. The base defense is little more than a depth chart. We use it to get an idea where players fit in the order, but it tells us very little about how those players will be used.

Tim from Normal, IL

Vic, a couple of years ago you explained to us why it’s a big deal for an offensive lineman to move from one side of the line to the other. Can you explain why it’s a big deal for an OLB to move to ILB?

You can’t run around blocks on the inside. You have to take them on square and hold your ground, and that becomes a lot of pounding for guys that are built for speed.

Dan from Tehachapi, CA

I am so excited to see Favre come back. When I was a kid, he was the reason I fell in love with this team. I don’t care what happened, you have to love the good and the bad. How excited are you?

I’m very excited.

Jeremy from Elkhart Lake, WI

I’ve been seeing a lot of analysts and people in general saying the goal of the Packers drafting Hundley was to develop and trade, since we should have Rodgers for five-plus years, but I think their goal is to develop Hundley to have a stud that can win games if/when Rodgers gets banged up in the future. What do you think?

At this point, the goal is to develop Brett Hundley into a player that makes the Packers’ roster better. As circumstances might present themselves, new goals might emerge.

Tony from Los Alamos, NM

Vic, I’ve asked myself would I still be a fan of the Packers if they were embroiled in Deflategate, and other scandals like Spygate and malfunctioning headsets? I’m not entirely sure I could remain a fan. Do you think this might be the last straw for some Patriots fans and, if so, why aren’t we hearing more outrage from them?

Loyalty is without conscience.

Scott from Milwaukee, WI

Did you have an inner-child moment during Harrison’s 102-yard touchdown?

My inner child has long since left my soul and is unlikely to return.

Lisa from Bismarck, ND

Vic, I’m a single mom with an almost six-year-old little boy and we are both huge Packers fans. My question is how do I go about explaining the intricacies of the game to him? Is there a book you recommend?

Don’t worry about the intricacies. Let him find the charm in the game first. Take him to a high school game. His senses will be awakened by the sound of the crowd, the band, the PA. Let him feel the thrill when the players charge onto the field in their shiny uniforms. Let him bundle against the chill, smell wet grass in its final days of fall. There’ll be plenty of time for all that cover two nonsense when he gets older. Now, when he’s young, is when he learns to love the game for all of the right reasons, which is to say for how it stole his heart.

Greg from Ripon, WI

Why are you such an idiot?

And they pay me, too.

Lori from Winona, MN

Thank you for your integrity.

I might be an idiot, but I’m a good idiot.

Matt from Pewaukee, WI

Vic, did you know your favorite team, the Steelers, are one of the most cheating teams in the league? Terry Bradshaw admitted to steroid use, yet, you think a little less air in the ball is that big of a deal? Bradshaw was never punished. I think there should be an asterisk next to all of his Super Bowls.

First of all, there was no rule forbidding use of steroids in the ’70s. Secondly, and this is most important, nobody knew much about steroids and their ill effects until later. They were hailed as a wonder drug that helped heal damaged tissue in players recovering from injury. That’s what Bradshaw was describing. Then, somebody got the idea steroids could be used to gain a competitive advantage, and that’s when the trouble started. To give you an idea how little was known about steroids back then, a draft pick named Steve Courson came into training camp in 1977 and did the unthinkable: He whipped Joe Greene in the Oklahoma drill. That’s when we started to get a feel for what steroids could do. Courson would go on to lead a crusade against steroids. They became a terrible problem, and it was a leaguewide problem. Lyle Alzado immediately comes to mind. He was a good man, a fun guy and a great interview.


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