Nicholas from Superior, WI

The 49ers have a whole tape of Rodgers drawing defenses offsides and catching them with 12 men on the field. Doesn’t that take time away from preparing to cover receivers, tackle running backs and block rushers?

That’s the idea. The more you can do, the more your opponent has to do.

Mike from Fairfield, CA

Vic, do you believe the 49ers’ attention to the hard count will cause the defensive players near the line to hesitate when the ball is snapped to avoid jumping offsides? Could this be as impactful as getting a few offsides calls in the game? Or have I overthought this?

If it makes them hesitate, the hard count is the equivalent of another pass-blocker.

Tim from Rosario, Santa Fe

Last two games, Packers held Lynch and Charles to less than 50 yards rushing. Do Packers win if they hold Hyde to less than 50 yards rushing, or is this more about stopping Kaepernick?

I think it’s more about stopping Colin Kaepernick because in the read option, it all begins with him. If you stop Hyde, you get Kaepernick. Pick your poison.

Paul from Kilrush, Ireland

Vic, have you an explanation as to why Green Bay is so successful at player development?

They believe in it. The Packers don’t just commit to it, they embrace it. My inbox is full of questions this week about the Packers’ identity. Draft and develop is their identity. It’s at the root of their success. Aaron Rodgers is a product of draft and develop. Do I need to go any further?

Joe from Stevens Point, WI

That game right there should put the debate to rest. Joe Flacco is elite.

I’m not a stats guy because I often think they lie, but I think his stats from last night are indicative of how he played: 20 of 33 for 189 yards, one touchdown, one interception, a 73.9 passer rating and a fumble lost. Crunch time? The kicker was the star.

Brad from Gallatin, TN

How do you add more creativity without adding volume?

By doing more out of the same formation and personnel grouping. The Packers showed a new formation and personnel grouping on Monday; it was on the play in which Randall Cobb rushed for 12 yards. The 49ers have seen it on tape. They’ll be prepared for it, but they’ll likely see something different out of that same bunch formation.

David from Valley City, ND

Vic, no timeouts due to the fear of a blocked punt? Love the coaching staff, but we needed that challenge on the fourth and 17. Agree?

Time out No. 3 followed a third-and-9 conversion with 7:34 to play, the ball at the Green Bay 31 and holding a 38-22 lead. Obviously, something was amiss. Yes, the Packers needed that timeout to use on a review. So, are we going to continue to perseverate on this fourth-quarter baloney, or are going to accept the fact a 10-point win is good enough? I’m satisfied. I’m ready to move on. I don’t feel an insatiable urge to analyze everything until there’s nothing left of a game but a pile of dust.

Tom from Bismarck, ND

Vic, you’ve managed to avoid any real questions for another year. You portray yourself as a mean-streets, tough kid from Pittsburgh, yet, you will only answer soft questions that protect your phony baloney job. You are the Pittsburgh throwback uniform of sportswriters.

I like that; it’s very witty. Plus, I’m in a really good mood today because it’s payday. This column has been very, very good to me. Keep reading, Tom, baby.

Scotty from Lombard, IL

Vic, do you think the game plan for Sunday will be to take away the 49ers running game and make them beat us with the pass?

No. 1, make him be a passer.

Read article: Packers are ready; remind yourself

Fred from Guatemala

How do you feel for the game on Sunday?

I think the Packers are going to get the best the 49ers have to offer, and I think Aaron Rodgers is going to put on a show for the place of his roots. Does Colin Kaepernick make you nervous? He makes me nervous. That’s a big man with a lot of athletic ability.

Brian from Fond du Lac, WI

“Just win, baby. Kaepernick has.” Kaepernick has won one less Super Bowl than Trent Dilfer, if you know what I mean. The defense is now gone; the 49ers are no more. I like their coach, though; he’s way better than the last guy.

I don’t have that list in front of me, Brian.

Dave from Lafayette, NY

Syracuse: Jim Brown and Ernie Davis.

Larry Csonka and Floyd Little. You do not want to play this game with me, Dave. I am a college football junkie. Joe Morris and Marty Januskiewicz.

Kevin from Palm Bay, FL

I’ve seen numerous articles from big-name sports websites saying the Packers offensive line has been playing very poorly. I’ve seen a great offensive line play extremely well against some very good pass-rushing teams. Am I missing something or are they just making something out of nothing?

You should never read those big-name sports websites again. They’re lying to you.

Rob from Green Bay, WI

I absolutely love how we have been going for it on fourth downs. I heard of that college coach who had some impressive statistical arguments for never punting, and I was wondering if that logic would catch on in the NFL. Do you think we should play fourth down conservatively or is it wise to be more aggressive in principle?

Ask Mike Tomlin what he thinks about going for it on fourth down. It’s great when it works. It’s really bad when it doesn’t work. As Coach Noll was fond of saying: When you win, you’re great. When you lose, you stink.

Mike from Las Vegas, NV

Vic, when traveling, do you pack your bag to leave Santa Clara prior to the game and then leave it on the bus?

Yes, but first a dog sniffs it.

Gary from Tompkinsville, KY

What is it going to take to get Jerry Kramer into the Pro Football Hall of Fame? He was a big part of the Packers sweep in the 1960s. He also made a key block on the quarterback sneak in the Ice Bowl.

I don’t know what it’s going to take, but he’s not the only Packers alumni deserving of a place in the Hall of Fame. Bobby Dillon is another such deserving Packers alumni, and my friend Rick Gosselin of the Dallas Morning News is mounting a campaign for Dillon, who had the misfortune of playing in the era that immediately preceded Lombardi’s arrival in Green Bay. Rick is also a member of the Hall of Fame selection committee. On his talkoffamenetwork.com website, Rick writes: “Players from losing teams have historically been punished by the Hall of Fame. Especially defensive players … and Dillon remains one of the classic oversights. This was a great player on a bad football team. Dillon intercepted 52 passes in his career, good for a tie for 26th all time. Joining him on that 26th rung are Hall-of-Famers Jack Butler, Mel Renfro and Larry Wilson. Cornerback Champ Bailey also shares that spot, and there is likely a bust in his future as well. But Dillon intercepted his 52 passes in fewer games (94) and fewer seasons (eight) than any of them. And Dillon did it with one less eye. He lost an eye in a childhood accident, but that didn’t prevent him from becoming an All-America at the University of Texas, a third-round NFL draft pick and a four-time Pro Bowl performer.”

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