‘Through the Lens’ will appear once per week during the offseason. Packers team photographer Evan Siegle takes us inside his favorite shots from the 2016 season.

Huddled Around Aaron

It is pretty routine for me to get a huddle shot before every game. The challenge is trying not to be redundant, having a clean shot. Ultimately I’m hoping to get some emotion or a visually graphical image.

There are several elements as to why I like this frame, which was taken during the first game of the regular season in Jacksonville. I think this image stands out because of the framing, the color, and the body language by Aaron Rodgers, who is shown in the middle of the pack. I used a 135mm lens at F2 to give it a very shallow depth of field.

As you can see in my contact sheet, I was originally going for a lens flare but it wasn't panning out. Because the huddle doesn’t last long, I quickly looked for something else. I’m glad I did because I walked right into a nice frame, which was Rodgers framed through some players. I snapped off 15 frames. The one highlighted in yellow was the deciding shot.

 

Throwback Blake

I really love this black-and-white portrait style image of Blake Martinez. The throwback jersey, the bandage on the bridge of his nose, and the look in his eyes give it an old-school, gritty look from the Nitschke era. It’s kind of a timeless image.

This photo was taken along the sidelines before the Dallas Cowboys game. I used a 70-200mm lens at 2.8 to compress the background.

 

Just Won the NFC North

This image might go down as one of my favorite images from the 2016 season. It’s a rare intimate image of Aaron as he sits by himself in his locker after the Packers defeated the Lions to win the NFC North. It’s also an image that holds value and means something, thanks to Aaron’s phrase, “Run the Table.” There was a lot of jubilation in the locker room. I was constantly trying to find moments of players hugging and celebrating. After the speeches were done, I turned and saw Aaron at his locker. He just sat there with the biggest smile on his face.

As a visual storyteller you want stop the reader in his/her tracks. I think this photo does that. It’s an image you can just stare at. Aaron’s body language and facial expression say it all.